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boywrestler:

typette:

womenfighters:

Legolas, eat your heart out.

Towards the end, you get to see the targets, she’s amazingly accurate.

I want to be this girl when I grow up

seriously I’ve always wanted to try archery because it’s so graceful and dignified yet powerful, but like, how the fuck do you even begin to get into that when you’re older?

homegirl.

(Source: , via rexobxo)

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glamourandgrenades:

Goonies never say die.

glamourandgrenades:

Goonies never say die.

(via sea-bells)

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(Source: cinecat, via renridinghoood)

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(Source: drunknight, via quillery)

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sweethomestyle:

youbroketheinternet
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(Source: recklessruffles, via rexobxo)

Photoset

caseyanthonyofficial:

This roll call scene was unbelievable

(via renridinghoood)

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library-lessons:

Or reading them, either.

library-lessons:

Or reading them, either.

(via samhumphries)

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jesuisperdu:

david crausby
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fleshcoatedtechnology:

FDA Approves First Prosthesis Controlled by Muscle Electrical Signals

Dean Kamen’s DEKA Arm is an electronic prosthetic that mimics natural arm and hand movement with an amazing level of finesse. It’s controlled by electrical signals from the wearer’s muscles. This week, the DEKA Arm became the first muscle-controlled prostheticapproved by the FDA for sale to the general public.
In the FDA study, 90% of test subjects were able to quickly adapt to using the DEKA Arm for tasks that were impossible with traditional arm prosthetics, like brushing hair and using keys and zippers.
This is a cyborg we can all support.
[FDA; DARPA via Engadget / Gizmodo]

fleshcoatedtechnology:

FDA Approves First Prosthesis Controlled by Muscle Electrical Signals

Dean Kamen’s DEKA Arm is an electronic prosthetic that mimics natural arm and hand movement with an amazing level of finesse. It’s controlled by electrical signals from the wearer’s muscles. This week, the DEKA Arm became the first muscle-controlled prostheticapproved by the FDA for sale to the general public.

In the FDA study, 90% of test subjects were able to quickly adapt to using the DEKA Arm for tasks that were impossible with traditional arm prosthetics, like brushing hair and using keys and zippers.

This is a cyborg we can all support.

[FDADARPA via Engadget / Gizmodo]

(via ruckawriter)